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British Sculpture Abroad in the 1960s

  • 3 August 2016

Harry Shunk, Installation View, Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form, 1969, showing clockwise from left: Mario Merz, Appoggiati, 1969, Mario Merz, Sit-in, 1968, Richard Artschwager, Blp, 1968, Robert Morris, Felt, 1967, Bruce Nauman, Neon Templates of the Left Half of My Body Taken at Ten Inch Intervals, 1966, Bruce Nauman, Untitled, 1965, Bruce Nauman, Collection of Various Flexible Materials Separated by Layers of Grease with Holes the Size of My Waist and Wrists, 1966, Barry Flanigan, Two Space Rope Sculpture, 1967, Alighiero Boetti, lo che prendo il sole a Torino il 19 gennaio 1969, 1969 
Photo: Harry Shunk 'In the 1960s, British sculpture enjoyed a complex transitional life, taking on a new, bold, and increasingly internationalized profile, at the very same time that its forms and meanings were being challenged and contested.' (taken from 'Introduction to British Sculpture in the 1960s' by Jon Wood from the Henry Moore Institute).

The second collection of essays in the third issue of British Art Studies look at how British Sculpture was perceived abroad during the 1960s. Various case studies, including one by Sam Gathercole on the British Constructivist Art exhibition of 1961/1962 which toured the US and Canada, create an overview of the impact and reception of British Sculpture abroad during this period.

British Art Studies is a free online art history journal and can be accessed here:http://ow.ly/VUh2302zgbw

Installation View, British Constructivist Art, American Federation of Arts, New York, April–May 1962, showing works by, left to right, John Ernest and Stephen Gilbert

American Federation of Arts records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Figure 2, Installation View, British Constructivist Art, American Federation of Arts, New York, April–May 1962, showing works by, left to right, John Ernest and Stephen Gilbert